Prevention is absolutely essential when it comes to heart disease. After heart disease has developed it can be very difficult to treat, although there is much that you can do to reverse some of the effects heart disease (dieting, exercise, supplements and more). If you have a genetic predisposition to heart disease, you should start taking steps to prevent its development when you are younger. Your efforts will pay off, and below are some of the easiest ways to lower your risk of heart disease and thus a heart attack.

Top 3 Easy Ways to Lower Your Risk of a Heart Attack

Method #1 – Don’t use tobacco or smoke to lower your risk of a heart attack

If you already smoke, quitting is one of the easiest ways to lower your risk of a heart attack dramatically. From the day that you quit smoking, your risk of heart disease will drop down to the same risk of a non-smoker within about 5 years. So, the sooner that you stop the better, and if you haven’t already you should start taking steps to quit smoking such as nicotine patches or other methods. Speak to your medical doctor for more information about this.

Method #2 – Improve your diet

Adding more heart healthy foods to your diet can lower your risk of a heart attack substantially. You should try to limit your intake of red meat as much as possible, and avoid deep fried foods, margarine, trans fats, and foods that are high in carbohydrates. Eat as many healthy sources of fat as you can when you do eat fat. Stick to natural whole foods as much as possible, and limit your intake of junk food or processed foods.

Method #3 Exercise regularly

Exercising for just 30 minutes per day every other day can dramatically lower your risk of a heart attack. Hundreds of studies have proven this. For instance, researchers found that people who participated in a formal exercise program had a reduced death rate of up to 25 percent from heart attack and other ailments. Try to exercise at least 30 minutes per day 5 days per week to lower your risk of a heart attack the most, and combine both cardiovascular exercise with resistance training.